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Goodbye to All That: Writers on Loving and Leaving New York

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My birthday was yesterday. We had a lovely weekend kicking off with a dinner out and followed by a family leaf peeping trip to Cold Spring. Yesterday Henry had his breakfast in our bed to extend our cuddle. What could be better than that on your birthday morning?

Despite the gorgeous autumn weather and fulfilling work projects I’m trying my best to fend off the impending winter blues. It’s only October but as soon as the light changes I start feeling down. I got one of those blue lights to help and am trying other things too. I find that curling up with a good book to wind down helps me get to sleep at a good time. Right now I’m reading Goodbye to All That, a collection of essays by authors (in homage to Joan Didian‘s famous essay of the same title) who have loved and left New York City. It’s resonating deeply because all summer we considered what life would be like living elsewhere. After lots of research and soul searching we’ve decided to stay. Still, it’s really interesting to hear these writer’s accounts of their big decision to leave.

4 Responses to Goodbye to All That: Writers on Loving and Leaving New York

  1. Lynne Spreen (@LynneSpreen) October 16, 2013 at 7:55 am #

    You’re surely being inundated now, due to having been featured in O Magazine, and I look forward to buying your book. I imagine you’ll be receiving a ton of suggestions as to women we wish you’d also painted, and in that vein, I’d like to recommend Dagny Taggart, the heroine of the much-maligned Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. Wild-eyed politicos have co-opted Rand for her extreme views, but when I was 16 and living in a violent household, her theory of “the sanction of the victim” saved me. Also the concept of shrugging, when people put too many strictures on you and then expect you to dance. Like they said in the movie War Games, sometimes “the only way to win is not to play.” But Dagny was heroic, independent, brilliant, beautiful, and she ran a railroad in mid-century 1900s, when rail was commanding and extensive. Best wishes, Samantha, for a gratifying and beautiful life.

  2. Samantha Hahn October 16, 2013 at 8:26 am #

    Hi Lynn,

    Thank you for reaching out. Yes, there are a number of characters I wish I could have included in this book. There are too many great heroines to fill one book. I may have to do another one and include Dagny. In this one I have Dominique Francon from The Fountainhead. Thank you so much for sharing your story and suggesting a character. All my best!
    Samantha

  3. Lynne Spreen (@LynneSpreen) October 16, 2013 at 8:05 pm #

    OMG, Dominique!! I can’t wait to get a copy. Thanks!

  4. Garrott Designs November 20, 2013 at 11:49 am #

    I had just read about this book on Daily Candy and it too, intrigued me as my boo and I consider greener pastures, (well just plain pasture) 😉 Thanks for blogging about the read!

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